Yamaha P45 Review – How Good Is The Yamaha P 45?

Yamaha's P45 keyboard is portable and has a good amount of features

Yamaha’s P45 keyboard is portable and has a good amount of features

  • Editor Rating

  • Rated 4.5 stars
$449.99
  • 90%

  • Yamaha P45
  • Reviewed by:
  • Published on:
  • Last modified: May 19, 2016
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 75%
  • Keys
    Editor: 100%
  • Features
    Editor: 52%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 65%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 75%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 90%
  • Price
    Editor: 88%


Pros

  • Portable
  • Decent amount of features
  • Full set of 88 weighted keys


Cons

  • Polyphony on the P45 has doubled to 64 notes, but that could still be considered low compared to high-end models
  • No recorder


The Yamaha P45 is an affordable, but fully functional digital piano that is perfect for intermediates and even for pros. A number of nice touches mean that this is a piano that feels comfortable to play, and this is combined with extra features that are great for learning or for creating and recording your own tracks.

What Are The Differences Between The Yamaha P45 And The P35?

Not too much has changed between the older P35 model and the newer Yamaha P 45.  The biggest difference is that the polyphony of the piano has been doubled from 32 notes on the P35 to 64 notes on the P45.  A USB port has also been added on this newer model.  At the same time however, the piano no longer sports MIDI ports as part of its connectivity repertoire.

Yamaha P45 Review – How Does It Play?

The Yamaha P45B is a full-sized 8-octave digital piano, as opposed to a keyboard which will often be only five or six octaves. What this means is that there is ample room for playing more complex music that requires both hands – which can often be a limiting factor of keyboards.

If you’ve ever tried playing piano pieces on a small keyboard, then you’ll know how cramped it is and you’ll know that often it is simply not possible. The Yamaha P45 goes beyond the cheap ‘starter keyboard’ by allowing room for growth with the full 88 keys. This also means that you can play duets on the P45B, which is essentially unfeasible on smaller models.

At the same time, the Yamaha P 45B also feels like a real piano. This is thanks to the weighted keys (Graded Hammer Standard weighted action) which are designed to feel just like analog keys. This balance is achieved because the low end is slightly heavier than the high end, which means if you’re used to playing on an upright or grand piano, you’ll be able to adapt to the feel of this model in no time.

This Video Shows Off The Yamaha P45:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Jq3kUsDqbI

How Does It Sound?

The Yamaha P45B also has something else going for it when it comes to sounding like a real piano. That’s the 64-note polyphony. This essentially means that the system is capable of playing 64 notes at the same time. Again, this is something that many starter keyboards will lack and will instead cut out when multiple keys are played simultaneously. With 64 notes supported, you will be able to play any chords imaginable, as well as duets. That also means you’ll be able to use a sustain pedal heavily without the notes cutting out.

Finally, the Yamaha P 45 also boasts what Yamaha calls ‘Advanced Wave Memory Stereo Sampling‘. This is designed to create a more realistic sounding instrument in stereo.  Another drawback of some digital pianos is often the sound, but this is an area in which Yamaha excels – you can rest assured that this model sounds almost as good as the real thing.

How Does The P45 Compare To Similarly-Priced Pianos?

Casio PX-150Yamaha P45Yamaha YPG-535Yamaha P115
RatingRated 4.5 starsRated 4.5 starsRated 4 starsRated 4 stars
Price$489.99$449.99$499.99$599.99
Criteria
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 85%
  • Keys
    Editor: 100%
  • Features
    Editor: 73%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 70%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 80%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 90%
  • Price
    Editor: 86%
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 75%
  • Keys
    Editor: 100%
  • Features
    Editor: 52%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 65%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 75%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 90%
  • Price
    Editor: 88%
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 65%
  • Keys
    Editor: 90%
  • Features
    Editor: 77%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 80%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 90%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 75%
  • Price
    Editor: 86%
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 92%
  • Keys
    Editor: 100%
  • Features
    Editor: 65%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 84%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 90%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 90%
  • Price
    Editor: 82%

What Special Features Does The P45 Have?

The Yamaha P 45 also has a few additional features that give it an edge over some of the alternative models.

For instance, like its predecessor the P35, dual mode is supported which allows you to play with two voices at once. This means you can have a piano sound, backed up by strings for instance, which creates a more dynamic effect and which many younger players will be able to get a lot of fun out of. This can be used in a dual mode too, whereby one hand will play piano and the other will play strings.

The P45's polyphony has been doubled to 64 notes

The P45’s polyphony has been doubled to 64 notes

In terms of voices, this digital piano boasts a total of 10 voices. This isn’t a huge selection compared to some other devices, but what it lacks in quantity it makes up for in quality. You can also alter the sound yourself by selecting from four types of reverb. There are also 4 levels of touch response (to your liking), and a selection of demo and preset songs to play along with (10 of each).

You can also play around with tuning calibration functions, a transpose function and a metronome for keeping time. A USB to HOST port also means that the keyboard can connect with a range of different devices for a wide variety of applications.

Who Is The Yamaha P 45 For?

The reason for all this comparison to electric keyboards is that the Yamaha P45 is in many ways similar to an electric keyboard. In terms of the appearance, this is a basic looking model that looks more like a keyboard than a piano. At just 26 pounds this is a lighter device, just like the Casio PX150, which may be a selling point for those who move around often, as it lacks some of the heft of a meatier instrument.

What’s more, the price is also more similar to a keyboard. This essentially then straddles the line between a keyboard and piano in terms of features as one of the more basic but affordable digital pianos.

Specifically this is an instrument that will appeal to intermediate learners as well as more experienced pianists with a more limited budget. If you’re just interested in a high quality sound with relatively few ‘gimmicks’ then this product has the right number of keys, a great feel, and an excellent sound.

What Do Owners Of The Yamaha P45 Think?

“Purchased for my daughter to take to college (she is classically trained and would be considered as an advanced student). She is very happy with the key feel and the controls…This might be the perfect unit for a college bound piano student who is use to practising on a standard piano.”
– Source: Amazon Customer (Amazon.com review)

“I love the sound”
– Source: Woman of Chayil (Amazon.com review)

What’s Missing From This Piano?

The P45 has weighted keys with touch response

The P45 has weighted keys with touch response

The more affordable price is also reflected in the relative lack of features. While there are some preset songs, a duo mode, and a few different voices, this is definitely a piano first and foremost with few bells and whistles.

That’s a good thing if you’re serious about playing the piano, but not such a good thing if you want to teach kids who enjoy playing with every sound under the sun.  Likewise, this is a ‘nice’ digital piano that isn’t really a suitable birthday present for a young kid who would probably get more fun from a ‘kids’ keyboard anyway.

If you have more budget though and you think you’ll benefit from some advanced features, then you might want to spend a little more on the Yamaha P115B for instance, to get extras such as a recording function and better polyphony that is lacking on the P45.

Popular Accessories For The Yamaha P45

Yamaha L85 Keyboard Stand for Yamaha P105/P115/P35/P45/YPG-535
$99.99
Rated 4.5 stars

M-Audio SP-2 Sustain Pedal with Piano Style Action for Keyboards
$19.99
Rated 4.5 stars

World Tour Deluxe Padded Keyboard Bench
$34.95
Rated 4.5 stars

Yamaha RH2C Stereo Headphones
$29.53
Rated 4.5 stars

ABC Piano Keyboard Stickers
$2.24
Rated 4.5 stars

On Stage Keyboard Dust Cover for 88 Key Keyboards
$16.95
Rated 4.5 stars

Gator 88 Note Keyboard Gig Bag; Slim Design (GKB-88 SLIM)
$104.99
Rated 4.5 stars

Specs
Keys88
Weighted Keys
Touch Response
Polyphony64
SpeakersTwo 6-watt
Recorder
Voices10
LCD Screen
Stand Included
Weight (lbs)26
Dimensions52 x 12 x 6
Preset Songs10
Phone/Out Jacks1
USB Ports1
MIDI Ports
AUX Jacks
Damper Pedals1
Auto Power-Off
Layering
Reverb
Split Mode
Transpose
Tempo Adjust
Metronome
Panel Sustain
Scale Types
Sound Boost
Duet
Damper Resonance
Chorus
Brilliance

Conclusion – Yamaha P45

Summary:

Overall, the Yamaha P45B does everything you need it to. It’s a straightforward digital piano with no excessive extras but it also creates a great sound and can handle anything you can throw at it. It’s a great deal, though it’s worth bearing in mind that spending just a little more will get you considerably more features.  This digital piano gets a hearty recommendation as a basic device that nevertheless is suitable to more advanced playing.

Click the button below to get the best deal and free shipping on the Yamaha P45:

$449.99
Rating
Rated 4.5 stars

{ 2 comments… add one }

  • Gerry Thomas January 9, 2017, 10:48 am

    I was disappointed with the information. Sorry. I went-in to try to find whether the P45 has an ORGAN voice. I’d want to play it with the band on songs such as Dire Straits’ WHY WORRY / & WHITER SHADE OF PALE etc..
    BUT there was NO mention of what the voices are.

    • Rick Stallworth January 9, 2017, 4:35 pm

      Hi Gerry – there are 10 total voices on the P45, two of which are organ voices. From the P45 manual…

      Pipe Organ 1 – A typical pipe organ sound (8 feet + 4 feet + 2 feet). Good for sacred music from the Baroque period.

      Pipe Organ 2 – This is the organ’s full coupler sound, often associated with Bach’s “Toccata and Fugue.”

      The other 8 voices are:

      Grand Piano 1
      Grand Piano 2
      Electric Piano 1
      Electric Piano 2
      Strings
      Harpsichord 1
      Harpsichord 2
      Vibraphone

      Hope that helps.

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