Yamaha P105 Review – An In-Depth Look At The P 105

yamaha p105

Yamaha’s P105 scores high marks across the board

UPDATE >>> The Yamaha P105 has been discontinued and is no longer being sold

>>> CLICK HERE For The Review Of The Newer Model, The P115 <<<

  • Editor Rating

  • Rated 4 stars
  • 80%

  • Yamaha P105
  • Reviewed by:
  • Published on:
  • Last modified: October 3, 2015
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 85%
  • Keys
    Editor: 100%
  • Features
    Editor: 65%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 84%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 90%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 90%
  • Price
    Editor: 82%


Pros

  • Great polyphony
  • Portable
  • Good amount of features
  • Four internal speakers


Cons

  • No MIDI port
  • Can only keep 1 user song in memory at a time
  • No LCD screen


Replacing the Yamaha P-95 wouldn’t be easy for any brand or company, let alone Yamaha themselves.  Surpassing your own technology is difficult to do, especially considering how ahead of its time the P-95 was.  But the upgraded Yamaha P105 delivers on all accounts, continuing the inspired innovation that Yamaha takes when they approach their keyboard design and sound.

Whether you’re using the Yamaha P105b for practice, performances, studio use or just to play around on, there is one constant: this keyboard delivers on its promise of keen design, high-quality performance and affordability.  From beginners to the seasoned pro, they Yamaha P-105 provides the action and sustainability of a grand piano in a portable, compact footprint.

What Special Features Were Found During Our Yamaha P105 Review?

While there are a wide variety of digital pianos in this price range, what really starts to separate the Yamaha P105b from its competition is the fact that it has separate woofers and speakers on each side of the keyboard.  Others only have a single full-range speaker on both sides.  This means that the P105 is able to produce the low, rumbling frequencies you love while not affecting the treble at all.  What you’re left with is a clean, pure, full and vibrant sound.

But it’s not just the low sound register that is special here.  The keys themselves are actually weighted to properly represent the lower register on an acoustic piano (aka graded action).  That, added with the four responsive touch settings (soft, medium, hard and fixed), means you’re not only getting quality sound reproducing, but quality feel reproduction as well.

Check Out This Video Showcasing A P105 Performance:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tytu9CfXHic

UPDATE >>> The Yamaha P105 has been discontinued and is no longer being sold

>>> CLICK HERE For The Review Of The Newer Model, The P115 <<<

What Types Of Sounds Come With The P-105?

The main feature of the P-105 is the grand piano voice.  While some might purchase this for the other sounds which are available, we chose to focus on this main sound for this P-105 review since it’s perhaps the most unique and innovative.  The 105’s sound sample is from the CFIIIS concert grand piano which is why the sound is called Pure CF.  This sample provides the strongest, most resonant and articulate reproduction of a grand piano Yamaha has ever developed.

yamaha p 105

Full set of 88 weighted keys

Yamaha is also well known for their acoustic piano sounds and the P-105 is no exception to the rule.  You get two amazing acoustic piano sounds with this model, perfectly answering the call for the mellow and bright sounds Yamaha users have become accustomed to.  You’ll love the rich, full harmonic and dynamic ranges that emit from the P-105.

You’ll also get some of the killer sounds Yamaha has made a staple of their product lines, like the Yamaha YPG-235 for instance, including drawbar organs, harpsichords, string pads with layering options, bass fills for your left and Rhodes and Wurly electric pianos.

How Does The P105 Stack Up Against Other Pianos?

Casio PX-150Yamaha P35Yamaha P105Korg SP170
RatingRated 4.5 starsRated 4.5 starsRated 4 starsRated 4 stars
Price$489.99$489.99
Criteria
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 85%
  • Keys
    Editor: 100%
  • Features
    Editor: 73%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 70%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 80%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 90%
  • Price
    Editor: 86%
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 65%
  • Keys
    Editor: 100%
  • Features
    Editor: 52%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 65%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 75%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 90%
  • Price
    Editor: 88%
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 85%
  • Keys
    Editor: 100%
  • Features
    Editor: 65%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 84%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 90%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 90%
  • Price
    Editor: 82%
  • Polyphony
    Editor: 80%
  • Keys
    Editor: 100%
  • Features
    Editor: 25%
  • Speakers
    Editor: 72%
  • Jacks/Ports
    Editor: 70%
  • Weight/Size
    Editor: 90%
  • Price
    Editor: 86%

What Are The Best Features Of This Piano?

There are some great features on the Yamaha P-105, such as the ten Pianist Styles that provide the accompaniment to your chord progressions.  The program follows your notes and chords as you play, giving you a “mirror” player to your left that available for all sounds (not just piano).

There is also the onboard, two-track MIDI recorder that allows you to capture all of your new compositions as well as lets you playback and play along to ones still in progress.  You can also transfer music from your computer to your keyboard as MIDI files (or in DAW or sequencer if you’re still working on them) thanks to the handy USB-to-Host connection port.  As you play, plug straight into your amp, mixer or recording device through the ¼-inch stereo out, making it simple to gig, record or just rock out at top volume.

If you’re a student or teacher, the P-105 is great since the duet mode allows you to split the keys in half with identical note ranges.  This is much easier and more efficient than playing on two different octaves as you would on an acoustic piano.  You can also assign the splits so that you can play bass with your left while holding the string section together with your right (keyboard splits between F# and middle C, but you can change this to any size split).

What Are Yamaha P105 Owners Saying?

“This is an excellent product and looks and sounds very professional. The standard Grand Piano sound is flawless.”
Source: Chad Hill (Amazon.com review)

“I think that for anyone just starting to play or ‘restarting’ this is a great choice with minimum investment in dollars.”
Source: Gold (Amazon.com review)

“Overall, I can’t believe for this price how great this feels/sounds and I love it! Way to go, Yamaha!”
Source: Overthinking It (Amazon.com review)

“I am happy with it and nice to have a full sized weighted keyboard with USB / Midi out. Note it is only 25 pounds.”
Source: David Carlin (Amazon.com review)

What’s Missing On The Yamaha P105?

yamaha-p105b

Four internal speakers

We didn’t find much to complain about when reviewing this digital piano, but there were a couple minor things (certainly not deal-breakers) that could be improved.

The unit has no standard MIDI output connector, unlike the Yamaha P-35 which we’ve also reviewed. In order to transfer MIDI to another device, you will have to instead use the onboard USB port, which will also require that you obtain a USB to MIDI interface cable, which isn’t very expensive.

The other drawback is that the P105 only allows you to save 1 user song to its internal memory at a time. If you want to record another song, you either have to overwrite what is already in memory, or you need to save the recorded song to another device via the USB port.

Popular Accessories For The Yamaha P105

Yamaha L85 Keyboard Stand for Yamaha P105/P115/P35/P45/YPG-535
$99.99
Rated 4.5 stars
Yamaha LP5A 3-Pedal Unit for P105B Digital Piano
$74.99
Rated 4.5 stars

World Tour Deluxe Padded Keyboard Bench
$34.95
Rated 4.5 stars

Audio-Technica ATH-M50x Professional Studio Monitor Headphones
$164.59
Rated 4.5 stars

Alfred's Basic Adult All-In-One Course Level 3: Lesson-Theory-Solo
$10.67
Rated 4.5 stars

Gator Cases Stretchy Cover - Fits 88-Note Keyboards
$24.99
Rated 4.5 stars

Gator 88 Note Keyboard Gig Bag; Slim Design (GKB-88 SLIM)
$104.99
Rated 4.5 stars

Specs
Keys88
Weighted Keys
Touch Response
Polyphony128
SpeakersFour 7-watt
Recorder2-track
Voices14
LCD Screen
Stand Included
Weight (lbs)26
Dimensions52 x 12 x 6
Preset Songs50
Phone/Out Jacks2
USB Ports1
MIDI Ports
AUX Jacks2 AUX Out (L/R)
Damper Pedals1
Auto Power-Off
Layering
Reverb
Split Mode
Transpose
Tempo Adjust
Metronome
Panel Sustain
Scale Types
Sound Boost
Duet
Damper Resonance
Chorus
Brilliance

UPDATE >>> The Yamaha P105 has been discontinued and is no longer being sold

>>> CLICK HERE For The Review Of The Newer Model, The P115 <<<

Conclusion – Yamaha P105

Summary:

All in all, this is exactly what we’ve come to expect from Yamaha – a brilliant portable keyboard that excels in sound, technology, quality and feel.  There are a million reasons to buy the P-105, but perhaps the most important factor of all is its extreme affordability.

If you’re looking for a great piano at a great price, click the button below to get the best deal and free shipping on the P105:

Rating
Rated 4 stars

{ 7 comments… add one }

  • Michael Hagglund July 4, 2014, 1:17 am

    While I agree that the Yamaha P-105 is a very nice digital piano for the money, one thing you mentioned is incorrect. The least expensive USB to MIDI interface (it’s more complex than a simple adapter) costs at least $125, and as far as I know only two companies make them: Kenton and iConnect. In my opinion, this makes the P-35 a better choice if you need a standard midi interface. However if you only need USB MIDI, the P-105 is an excellent choice, with more features and better sound, although it’s more expensive as well.

    • Roger Shore August 5, 2014, 2:51 pm

      It’s certainly true that you need a USB host device – like the Kenton MIDI USB Host – to be able to connect the P105 to other MIDI devices with standard DIN connectors. But even allowing for the cost of that device (and, as you say, they’re not cheap at around £85) I think that cost can probably be justified…
      The new P.105 ‘Pure CF’ pianos samples are superb…. Much better than the P.35 piano sound (IMHO of course!).
      I can only deduce that Yamaha left off the ‘standard’ MIDI connectors on this model to try and encourage those with MIDI setups to go for the more expensive P.155…… I think they probably knew that the P.105 was going to be a real value for money winner, and felt they were maybe ‘cutting their own throats’ – sales wise – if they fitted standard MIDI connectors as well..?…..

  • JakeLess October 23, 2014, 4:50 pm

    A person doesnt need more than a chinese USB MIDI cable that can be had for several dollars. I use one and it works very well. Spending $125 on MIDI interface is crazy.

    • Roger Shore December 2, 2014, 9:55 pm

      You’ve missed the point here a bit I think…. The P.105 only has a USB to host port, which intended to be connected to a computer, which acts as the host. You cannot use a simple USB to MIDI cable to get MIDI data in or out.
      This is why the Kenton and other similar units exist. They act as the USB host , and allows you to connect to other MIDI devices, with standard MIDI ports, without the need to use a computer.
      So it’s not ‘carzy’ to spend $125 on an interface. In this case — unless you want to use a computer as well — it’s the only way to connect this unit to other MIDI devices with standard MIDI connectors. A simple cable just won’t work….

  • kamran November 13, 2014, 12:11 am

    I am a full time musician, tonight I took it to a restaurant as I was booked to play, I connected it to a nice amplifier and I loved the sound, so realistic.
    You cant go wrong with this.
    I only use the piano sounds and have nothing to do with other features.

    Thank you Yamaha

  • Clyde Spangler February 11, 2015, 6:57 pm

    Used it out at a solo gig. Loved the 2nd piano sound. Loved that the built in rhythms were usable in many songs that I do. I often layer a pad sound with the piano. I was disappointed in that there was no such sound. The strings have way too much vibrato and don’t sound as good when layered. My other major concern is that you can’t save the reverb or layer settings. I have to do a lot of button pushing between songs. When you try to bring in the strings or rhythm half way through the song while you are playing, it changes the settings drastically.
    I have to stop playing and then add the string layer or rhythm which of course disrupts the flow of the song. My suggestion to Yamaha is…bring back the sliders to allow such changes while playing and let us save the reverb settings. Otherwise a fantastic sounding a feeling piano that is super light and easy to take to gigs.

  • Kelly Johnson September 25, 2016, 5:50 pm

    What I love is the electric piano patch (“Vintage EP”). I wonder if that’s sample of a Rhodes piano.

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